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Find Lost Objects in Los Angeles with Augmented Reality Tour

Find Lost Objects in Los Angeles with Augmented Reality Tour
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Digital artist John Craig Freeman has created an augmented reality tour for people in Los Angeles where they can find various lost objects in an augmented world. In 2014, Freeman had walked through the streets of Los Angeles and interviewed random strangers. He asked them only one question “What have you lost?” With the answers he wanted to learn about the residents’ psyche. A varied range of answers starting from “dignity,” “water,” “fame,” etc. were obtained.

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An Augmented Reality Public Memorial

After talking to each person, he took their 360 degree portrait and used it to create an avatar. The avatars were then paired with digital representation of the lost “item” of each person which would then be geo-tagged to the location where Freeman had taken the interview. These stories could be viewed using an augmented reality app. Freeman says that Los Angeles is now “littered with lost objects and avatars.”

The aim of this art installation was to develop a type of augmented reality public memorial. Freeman said “What is the equivalent of a public square now that we’re all living in a mobile network structure? Art gets put in public squares as part of identity formation. I was trying to understand how to address that in a distributed public square.”

The project also included public workshops and clinics at the museum and was commissioned by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art’s Art + Technology Lab.

How to Visit this AR Public Memorial?

You have to download the Layar augmented reality app and scan a QR code on the project’s site. You will then be able to see each person’s story at the locations where the interview was taken. As you hold your mobile device in that place, the avatar and the lost item will be visible to you, along with the stories. You will be able to view Los Angeles from other’s eyes.

This is not the first time Freeman has worked with augmented reality technology. He had developed a public AR installation in 2010 which was called Border Memorial: Frontera de los Muertos. He dedicated the memorial to “the thousands of migrant workers who have died along the U.S./Mexico border in recent years.”

Another installation was also developed to honor the 1989 student uprising at Tiananmen Square in China. He along with other artists created virtual replicas of Tank Man and the Goddess of Democracy.

This Los Angeles augmented reality memorial is not political like his other works. So, get the AR app and see the lost objects in Los Angeles.

What about you?

Are you going to use the Layar app to experience this AR memorial? Have you used augmented reality in similar other areas? Share your thoughts in the comments below.

Image & Article Source – fusion.net

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Some opinions expressed in this article may be those of a guest writer and not necessarily by augmentedrealitytrends.com

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